“Adverse action”

Information on “adverse actions” (for example, not hiring an applicant or firing an employee) is available from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). The EEOC has recently released updated guidance, and we will share it on this blog site. In the meantime, consider the FTC guidance, which is equally important to follow. When an adverse…

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Sample Questions to Ask References, Part 9

By this point in the conversation, a respectable amount of rapport should have been established between the reference and the caller or his agents.  The reference, in particular, should by now be very much at ease with the caller and the nature of the questions.  Now is the time to explore some rather direct questions…

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Sample Questions to Ask References, Part 7

These next couple of questions address one new skill that is vitally important, and another that is essentially another version of an earlier question, to examine whether or not the responses to both are consistent.  It’s important to understand that these questions are not designed to “trick” a reference, but rather to help the prospective…

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Sample Questions to Ask References, Part 6

Now we’re coming into an area where the questions are a little more objective, but not totally!  I intentionally bounce back and forth between objective and subjective questions so the reference doesn’t get the impression that I’m just asking questions that require the reference to just express his opinion and becomes uncomfortable with the tone…

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Employment Screening Predictions for 2017

The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) has released its 2017 Hiring Trends report. The report covers five core predictions that largely align with the advice Barada has been imparting to its clients: Ban the box will become the norm. Screening of contingent workers will grow. Continuous screening will increase. Social media screening will continue.…

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Appeals Court Establishes Criteria by Which Employers “Willfully” Violate the Fair Credit Reporting Act

On January 20, 2017, in an opinion issued for Syed v. M-I, LLC, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that employers can “willfully” violate the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA). The criteria cited by the court was providing job applicants with a pre-employment background check disclosure that also includes a liability waiver for employers and others.…

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